I’ve been exploring how stacking different floorplate variants can be used to develop the morphology of an urban block beyond simply generating 2D spatial arrangements. So far, these explorations have been basic drawings of stacked floorplates and creating models to explore the nature of the resulting voids.

The drawings below are a development of these explorations and include, for the first time, sketch sections.

Drawings and computer generated graphic exploring the 3D form of the urban block through stacked floorplates.

Drawings and computer generated graphic exploring the 3D form of the urban block through stacked floorplates.

 

Drawings and model photographs exploring the 3D form of the urban block through stacked floorplates.

Drawings including a long section and cross section, and model photographs exploring the 3D form of the urban block through stacked floorplates.

 

Where the number of different floorplate variations becomes large (the second set of drawings shown above), the nature of the central void space in the urban block becomes somewhat uncontrolled and likely difficult to inhabit. In a more regular arrangement of floorplates (as shown in the first exploration), if would be conceivable that the internal void spaces could become habitable terraces and gardens.